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Why Clacton Is A Perfect Target For Ukip!

Posted by Greg Lance - Watkins (Greg_L-W) on 03/09/2014

Why Clacton Is A Perfect Target For Ukip!
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Why Clacton Parliamentary constituency Is A Perfect Target For Ukip & Nigel Farage’s brand of cult like populism:

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Hi,
if you read the case study of ‘The Center for Social Justices’ on Clacton you will start to appreciate just why it is potentially the most suitable chance Ukip has of having someone (anyone) elected to Parliament – especially as Parliament becomes ever less relevant to the Governance of the once United Kingdoms – now little more than a squabbling series of regions ruled over by the malign and self serving EU.
Ukip’s cult like style requiring little serious thought in terms of policies or any issue of gravitas much beyond jumping on any populist band wagon to garner votes from a less well educated sector of the electorate who feel challenged and out manoeuvered in the job market by waves of immigrants from the EU. An older sector of the population is attractedf under a thinly veilled racist extremism they believe will provide jobs for their children and granchildren as they complete their scratch cards and dispense with books, education and in many cases even a table to eat from.
The stridency and name calling of Ukip’s leadership for publicity sake apeals to such an unthinking under belly of society sadly. A sector of society all too willing to blame immigrants or for that matter anyone else for the failures of their lives rather than admit their own short comings.
It seems there are regions, or at least sufficient of the underbelly of society together with societies failure where the unrelenting chavveery, bullying and mindless centralised control appeals even though it is clear just what Ukip’s thoughts related to debate and the electorate are:
ATKINSON, Janice 02Ukip MEP Janice Atkinson
Ad-Van EUkipNo Substitute for leadership, gravitas and policies!
NATTRASS, Mike 01Hardly A Party to Take Seriousl
 UKIP CHICKEN PROTEST 01Ukip Staff & MEPs expect to be taken seriously in Brussels
EU MEP Cartoon 03
That it is currently rumoured that the Tories will be fielding Garry Barlow a ‘celeb’ rather than a member of socie3ty of gravitas and achievement outside of entertainment and as a showman, to cash in on the populist vote of the sub economic and poorly educated majority of the electorate in Clacton is a sad reflection of the times!
Consider this extract from the case study in question:
‘Clacton is the end of the line – it is not just the last station from the west but it’s also
where a lot of troubled people end up.’
This charity worker’s blunt description of Clacton-on-Sea epitomises the ‘rise and fall’
image that grips many seaside towns. But walking through its main streets the sense of
decline is not obvious – on summer afternoons the beach is busy, cafes are trading and
children enjoy the seaside attractions. Clacton appears to be a bustling town of over
55,000 people.
51
‘It’s when you scratch below the surface that you start to see the problems Clacton has,’ said
a businesswoman who has run a bed and breakfast near the town’s pier since the 1960s.
‘What has happened to Clacton is really sad, in fact it’s disgraceful. The place was so
vibrant through the 1960s and 1970s – you would see coaches streaming in for six
months of the year. I couldn’t walk down the pavement because the place was so busy.
But there was no investment and the place has deteriorated, the Pier ward is now
considered to be a place in poverty which would have been unthinkable.’
Many see the 1980s as the point where things started to decline in Clacton. The Town and
Country Building Society closed its head office, Butlins holiday camp shut down, and the
emergence of foreign holidays meant a lot of Clacton’s tourists became day trippers. Since
then, Clacton’s greatest problem has been a stagnating economy, fuelled largely by a lack of
sustainable jobs and high levels of worklessness. As the CSJ highlighted in its
Signed on, Written
off
report earlier this year, in one neighbourhood in the Pier ward, 54 per cent of people aged
16-64 are on out-of-work benefits – the fifth highest percentage in the country. Ironically, it
was the Pier area that had previously provided so much of the town’s employment.
or perhaps this extract sparks your understanding of why a personality cult like Ukip is so suitable for Nigel Farage’s ambitions – especially when you consider that even the pundits seem to believe the pollsters in predicting the Tory vote will collapse and follow their local personality to return Douglas Carswell in a different guise, to suit his aims and pander to his brand of populism and showmanship – ever the drama queen but all too popular for his willingness to cock a snoot at the grown ups of politics which is such a key to Farage’s rise to infamy!
Unlike many towns that suffer economic decline, Clacton’s population has actually been
increasing – rising by 29 per cent over the period of 30 years between 1981 and 2011 to
55,347.
56
Because property prices are considerably lower than London and other parts of
Essex, Clacton has become an increasingly popular town to retire to. A recent survey found
Clacton is the fifth most popular retirement coastal town in Britain, with nearly a third of
residents claiming state pensions.
57
Compared to national figures, Clacton has a lower than
average proportion of 25-44 year olds and higher than average number of people who are
65 and over.
58
This has created a situation where a large proportion of the population does
not work, leaving the local economy struggling. Although this does include some pensioners,
43 per cent of Clacton’s 16 to 74 year olds are economically inactive.
59
A former employee of the regional tourist board said: ‘It is difficult for a town when much of
its work is seasonal, but it’s a million times worse when you have large parts of the population
that don’t work at all. A lot of people moved to Clacton from London to retire and have
priced locals out of good property, that is a source of tension.’
The local economy is further hindered by low pay. In 2010 the median household income
in Clacton was £13,648,
60
compared to the median in England and Wales of £24,242. A
major barrier to employment is a low skills base – 41 per cent of adults in Clacton have
no qualifications, which is almost double the national average for England and Wales.

Case Study 3:

Clacton-on-Sea

1871
A pier is built for steamships operated by the Woolwich Steam Packet Company to dock at,
bringing thousands of visitors from London.
1920
The London Road opens to deal with the influx of holiday makers.
1937
Billy Butlin opens an amusement arcade and a holiday camp to accommodate holiday makers.
1983
Butlins holiday camp closes down due to a change in tastes and the rise of package holidays abroad.
2009
A new 50-foot helter skelter opens on Clacton pier.
2010
A neighbourhood in Jaywick is named the most impoverished ward in the Indices of Multiple
Deprivation. 62 per cent of working age residents receive benefits, compared to a national average
of 15 per cent.
a
Initially planned as a holiday destination for Londoners in the 1930s, many of
the holiday-makers became permanent residents. Unlike other ‘plotland’ villages Jaywick was not
demolished after the war.
2011
A new rollercoaster is added to Clacton pier to mark the start of British Tourism week.
a
The Guardian,
Essex resort of Jaywick named England’s most deprived town,
29 March 2011 [accessed via: http://www.guardian.
co.uk/society/2011/mar/29/jaywick-essex-resort-most-deprived (29/07/13)]; the wards of Clacton-on-Sea covered here are:
Alton Park, Bockings Elm, Burrsville, Golf Green, Haven, Peter Bruff, Pier, Rush Green, St Bartholomews, St James, St Johns, St
Marys, St Pauls

 
The Centre for Social Justice
20
‘Clacton is the end of the line – it is not just the last station from the west but it’s also
where a lot of troubled people end up.’
This charity worker’s blunt description of Clacton-on-Sea epitomises the ‘rise and fall’
image that grips many seaside towns. But walking through its main streets the sense of
decline is not obvious – on summer afternoons the beach is busy, cafes are trading and
children enjoy the seaside attractions. Clacton appears to be a bustling town of over
55,000 people.
51
‘It’s when you scratch below the surface that you start to see the problems Clacton has,’ said
a businesswoman who has run a bed and breakfast near the town’s pier since the 1960s.
‘What has happened to Clacton is really sad, in fact it’s disgraceful. The place was so
vibrant through the 1960s and 1970s – you would see coaches streaming in for six
months of the year. I couldn’t walk down the pavement because the place was so busy.
But there was no investment and the place has deteriorated, the Pier ward is now
considered to be a place in poverty which would have been unthinkable.’
Many see the 1980s as the point where things started to decline in Clacton. The Town and
Country Building Society closed its head office, Butlins holiday camp shut down, and the
emergence of foreign holidays meant a lot of Clacton’s tourists became day trippers. Since
then, Clacton’s greatest problem has been a stagnating economy, fuelled largely by a lack of
sustainable jobs and high levels of worklessness. As the CSJ highlighted in its
Signed on, Written
off
report earlier this year, in one neighbourhood in the Pier ward, 54 per cent of people aged
16-64 are on out-of-work benefits – the fifth highest percentage in the country. Ironically, it
was the Pier area that had previously provided so much of the town’s employment.
52
Just a few miles along the coast from Clacton is Jaywick, which according to the Indices of
Multiple Deprivation 2010 has the most deprived neighbourhood in England.
53
Some of the
people who use Clacton’s emergency food services and the soup kitchen walk from Jaywick,
a village that has suffered from isolation and deteriorating housing and now has high levels of
economic dependency. Some 35 per cent of working-age people claim some form of out-of-
work benefit
54
and 54 per cent of the population aged 16 and over have no qualifications.
55
One counsellor, who previously worked in Jaywick, said locals refer to it as ‘Beirut’ and that in
recent years ‘it has started policing itself ’. She added: ‘The problems in Jaywick seem to be a
lot more concentrated than the rest of Clacton. I’ve heard some fairly nasty stories. If someone
does something bad to you, the reaction is not to call the police but to deal with it yourself. It
almost seems like a warped version of care in the community.’
51
Office for National Statistics,
Census
:
KS102EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (31/07/13)]
52
Centre for Social Justice,
Signed On, Written Off
, London: Centre for Social Justice, 2013, p42
53
Department for Communities and Local Government,
The English Indices of Deprivation 2010, Neighbourhoods Statistical Release,
24 March 2011, p2 [accessed via:
(16/07/13)]
54
Office for National Statistics,
Census: KS102EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (26/07/13)]
55
Office for National Statistics,
Census: QS502EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (26/07/13)]

 
Turning the Tide | Case Study 3: Clacton-on-Sea
21
three
Unlike many towns that suffer economic decline, Clacton’s population has actually been
increasing – rising by 29 per cent over the period of 30 years between 1981 and 2011 to
55,347.
56
Because property prices are considerably lower than London and other parts of
Essex, Clacton has become an increasingly popular town to retire to. A recent survey found
Clacton is the fifth most popular retirement coastal town in Britain, with nearly a third of
residents claiming state pensions.
57
Compared to national figures, Clacton has a lower than
average proportion of 25-44 year olds and higher than average number of people who are
65 and over.
58
This has created a situation where a large proportion of the population does
not work, leaving the local economy struggling. Although this does include some pensioners,
43 per cent of Clacton’s 16 to 74 year olds are economically inactive.
59
A former employee of the regional tourist board said: ‘It is difficult for a town when much of
its work is seasonal, but it’s a million times worse when you have large parts of the population
that don’t work at all. A lot of people moved to Clacton from London to retire and have
priced locals out of good property, that is a source of tension.’
The local economy is further hindered by low pay. In 2010 the median household income
in Clacton was £13,648,
60
compared to the median in England and Wales of £24,242. A
major barrier to employment is a low skills base – 41 per cent of adults in Clacton have
no qualifications, which is almost double the national average for England and Wales.
61
The
number of children in Clacton passing five GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and maths
is only 43 per cent – below the national average in England of 59 per cent.
62
Sue Peachey, who has lived in Clacton for 25 years, is team leader at Open Road, an addictions
charity that has 11 centres for drug and alcohol treatment across and Essex and Suffolk.
She said: ‘What we have seen with many clients is they have never worked, and some come
from families where parents haven’t worked. It is a generational issue and it is difficult when
you are trying to help someone who has never been engaged with work.
‘We have a very good success rate but it is not easy. I think the problems affecting the local
area do make it more difficult to help people. There is no industry here, no jobs and that lack
of stability makes it very complicated for people trying to move off addictions – people want
some kind of motivation.’
56
Office for National Statistics,
1981 census – small area statistics, 1991 census – small area statistics, 2001 census – standard tables; Census:
KS102EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (22/07/13)] This number is an best-fit estimate as the ward structure of
Clacton has changed over this period
57
Liverpool Victoria, Press release,
UK plans a retirement revolution,
1 March 2013 [accessed via: http://www.lv.com/adviser/working-with-lv/
news_detail/?articleid=3117318 (15/07/13)]
58
Tendring District Council,
Tendring District Council Local Developmental Framework, Planning Services, Core Strategy and Development Policies
Document, Technical Paper 4 – Spatial Portrait
planning/planning%20policy/TechnicalPaper4SpatialPortrait.pdf (29/07/13)]
59
Office for National Statistics, Census:
QS601EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (26/07/13)]
60
Tendring District Council,
Tendring District Council Local Developmental Framework, Planning Services, Core Strategy and Development Policies
Document, Technical Paper 4 – Spatial Portrait
, October 2010, p27
61
Office for National Statistics,
Census: KS501EW
, Nomis: 2011 [accessed via http://www.nomisweb.co.uk (10/07/13)], this is for all people over 16
62
Department for Education,
2012 Performance Tables
, Department for Education: 2012 [accessed via: http://www.education.gov.uk/
schools/performance/ (22/07/13)]

 
The Centre for Social Justice
22
Councillor Peter Halliday, Leader of Tendring District Council (TDC), said: ‘It is a fact that
Clacton has changed significantly over the years and, in keeping with many other seaside
towns, its economy has altered dramatically. Like other resorts we face a number of
difficult challenges with more people choosing to go abroad for their holidays. That said,
we still get more than one million visitors a year spending almost a million pounds a day
in the district. One of our biggest challenges is to find ways to encourage them to return
so that we can make the very most of that spending potential. That is still very much a
work in progress.’
The CSJ was told that one of the biggest social problems is that the town has a high number
of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs). One official referred to it as ‘bedsit land’. The Essex
town is home to a large number of bed and breakfasts, many of which have been turned into
bedsits or other kinds of temporary accommodation. Another Pier B&B owner said: ‘Because
there aren’t as many tourists staying overnight many of us B&B owners have started letting
some of our rooms out to the council for emergency accommodation. It’s not what you want
to be known for, as it is hardly going to encourage business to your B&B, but you have to pay
the bills.’ A Government report said HMOs can have a negative social impact on areas and in
some cases lead to crime and anti-social behaviour.
63
There is a forum of frontline organisations and individuals, Clacton Central Community
First, that comes together to discuss social problems and ways of countering them. One
forum member said: ‘One of the biggest problems is HMOs – overcrowding brings so many
problems to a society. Clacton simply doesn’t have the resources or things in place to help
people. Local people are doing their best to fight this, but it’s an uphill struggle and the
council and local authority only seem to be acknowledging this now.’ Concerns have been
expressed that HMOs can be detrimental to people’s health as well as the community. A
report by the University of Essex’s School of Health and Human Sciences recently looked at
the mental health of vulnerable people living in bedsits in seaside towns and found that the
living conditions can have a significant impact on people.
64
Councillor Halliday said: ‘There is an HMO problem in Clacton, especially in the Pier ward
which is in the heart of the town centre. We are tackling this by introducing new licensing
regulations to ensure that properties must come up to a certain standard before they can
become HMO.’
Some officials in the town have said that there has been an increase of HMOs since the
Tendring Night Shelter was opened in the town around four years ago. The shelter aims to
provide support so clients can become independent. Residents, who are allowed to stay for
28 nights, are provided with support from Tendring Mental Health Support and local charities.
After clients of the shelter complete their stay, many move into HMOs and need continuing
support. The shelter has drawn in some people from other parts of Essex and further afield
63
Department for Communities and Local Government,
Evidence Gathering – Housing in Multiple Occupation and possible planning
responses – Final Report
, London: Department for Communities and Local Government, September 2010, pp6-7
64
Barratt C, Green G, Speed E, Price P,
Understanding the relationship between mental health and bedsits in a seaside town
, University of
Essex School of Health and Human Sciences and Tendring District Council, 2012 [accessed via:
bedsits_and_mental_health_report.pdf
(16/07/13)]

who have then remained in Clacton and continued to use local services. One former shelter
resident said: ‘The night shelter is a life saver. It offers great support, but obviously it means
there will be more people moving from different areas to Clacton so they can get help.’
Tracy Cooke, from Clacton, is the co-ordinator at the local Salvation Army Community
Centre, which runs a food bank service. She said: ‘The rise in food we hand out in recent
years has been incredible and is no longer sustainable so we are having to move to another
delivery model so we can cope with the demand. I have been here for seven years and in
the first two years we would have the occasional family coming in for food on referral. But
in the last four years we have seen a major increase. Our majority client base changed from
older people to males aged 25-45 who may be staying in bedsits or are couch surfing. In the
last year we gave out 2,500 food parcels, which I could never have expected.’
A frontline service provider said: ‘The picture of life in Clacton and where the town is going
is really frightening. What has happened here is indicative of many seaside towns, but much
more could be done. We would like to see more done with the Big Society Fund. Many
people lack the basics for getting into work or training, like something as obvious as a fixed
abode. More funding to social enterprises could improve the situation.’
The TDC has said that if it was given greater powers to deliver services, the local area would
benefit. Ian Davidson, Chief Executive of TDC, said: ‘Giving greater power and accountability
to the districts could help solve the problems in our local areas. We are on the ground and we
have the local knowledge and an understanding of the local agencies. If it’s done at a local level
you can actually switch money to being less reactive and more proactive. We recently ran a
‘families with complex needs’ pilot and it worked very well because we could co-ordinate
it better with the local agencies. We would like to see this delivery model used more in the
future – it is better for the taxpayer, the community and people we want to help.’
The local authority has agreed the town ‘is not fulfilling its potential’ and that it ‘lacks a
distinctive quality tourism/visitor offer’.
65
As well as improving current facilities, the council has
said it needs to develop new ones. It has been reported in local media that a £30 million
development may be outlined soon.
66
While fresh investment in the Pier area will be widely welcomed, it is becoming clear that
seaside towns, like Clacton, can no longer afford to rely solely on tourism and will need to
build a more stable economy.
65
Tendring District Council and INTend,
Celebrate-on-Sea, Putting the fun back into Clacton!
: 2010, p12 [accessed via: http://www.tendringdc.
gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/business/regeneration/clacton/Celebrate%20on%20sea%20reduced%20file%20size.pdf (29/07/13)]
66
This is Total Essex,
Cause for optimism in Essex ‘benefit ghetto’ says council
, 23 May 2013 [accessed via: http://www.thisistotalessex.co.uk/
Cause-optimism-Essex-benefit-ghetto-says-council/story-19068629-detail/story.html#axzz2ZmR4gTSD (22/07/13)]

To view the original of this case study CLICK HERE & start at page 19!
.

Regards,

Greg_L-W..

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
 

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2 Responses to “Why Clacton Is A Perfect Target For Ukip!”

  1. Just because you list a load of statistics from various sources does not detract from the insults you heap on the Clacton electorate. Just because they may not have been in the front row when academic ability was given away should not disqualify anyone from voting as they wish. I take it from your inferences that those whom you class as the “underbelly” of society should not be consulted when election time comes around. I can tell that you are suffering a liver complaint that perhaps some Andrews liver salts may cure although judging by your many rants I think that is unlikely. Whether you like UKIP or Douglas Carswell does not excuse todays offering and only reinforces my view that you are only bitter and twisted over some historic event yet to be disclosed. I write many short articles that are critical of government policy and individuals but I never resort to your low standards. Why not try and entertain to get your message across as it will attract far more readers. On the odd occasion I have written something vaguely in support of your comments I don’t seem to receive a reply so I have concluded that it is opposition you crave rather then any adult form of discussion. Lastly I was wondering why such an “underbelly” should be contemplating voting for a UKIP candidate rather then another Tory. Perhaps it’s because they prefer the message as well as the messenger but then that doesn’t fit in with your ideas of what the democratic process is all about. Try taking the medicine as I’m convinced the problem lies in your underbelly.

    Like

    • Hi,

      thanks for taking the trouble to provide your opinion yet again, it tells us so much about you and your personal ambitions as a political candidate.

      I find your view to be self serving sanctimonious drivel.

      I have quoted the report of a nationally recognised and Government funded research organisation FACTS not spin and not efforts to buy votes.

      I am sorry you seek to try to spin the FACTS to try to sabotage the reality and your desperate effort to defame me.

      Fortunately the majority of readers of this blog have sufficient judgement to read past your distortions and as I have said all along I do not seek numbers reading and consulting my blogs as they are provided by me at my expense based on my beliefs and backed by facts – thereby providing an accurate and reliable sourced archive of facts found usefull by serious and responsible researchers and journalists alike.

      A blog which has fortunately never once been found to have lied or misrepresented the facts, nor once to have provided false evidence of a factual nature of any consequence and which is open to comment and ALWAYS willing to make any correction to ensure accuracy.

      Despite the lack of facts in your personal opinion and frequently ill informed criticism based on your dishonest presentation of your assumtions you are welcome to keep commentimng as it always seem to grant an opportunity of correcting popular misunderstandings and ensure answers to lies and propaganda by members of the Farage cult in defence of the corruption and inadequacies of Ukip which this blog consistently exposes and collates.

      Regards,
      Greg_L-W.

      Like

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